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Full text of "An Angel from Texas (Warner Bros. Pressbook, 1940)"

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Directed by R 


SCREEN PLAY BY PRED HIGLO, JR. oo BERTRAM MILLHAUSER « BASED ON APLAY BY GEORGE &, KAUPMAN 
A WARNER BROS. ~ FIRGT NATIONAL PICTURE 








Peter is Marty is 
a genius an expert 
ossiht & oovat 
dopey . everything 
sort of way! ...but work! 


Beast, 


Marge 
is like a 
7 diamond“. 
actress... zs ..-beautiful 
in all her dreams! 55 but awful hard! 


\4 
wite TI ‘oe 


¢ Oe 


nothing 
...just like 
he started! 





Mat 302—8¥% inches x 3 Columns (351 lines )—45c 








with the ‘Brother Rat’ Cast 


EDDIE ALBERT - ROSEMARY LANE 
WAYNE MORRIS - JANE WYMAN 
RONALD REAGAN - RUTH TERRY 


Directed by RAY ENRIGHT 


A WARNER BROS.-First National Picture 
Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser 
Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 





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[3] 


, . SS ET PEW. 
ONT HECK WAS, NG 100° a alae 





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That rollicking, 
frolicking ‘Bro- 
ther Rat” cast is 
holding another 
laugh jamboree! 
Don’t miss it... 
it’s funderful! 





witH THE ’ ae 
Royer ae 


EDDIE ALBERT -ROSEMARY LANE 
WAYNE MORRIS - JANE WYMAN 
RONALD REAGAN - RUTH TERRY 


Directed by RAY ENRIGHT 
A WARNER BROBS.-First National Picture 


Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser* Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 
Cun) 


Mat 208—7¥2 inches x 2 columns (214 lines )—30c 





(WARNER BROS) Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser * Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 


VY 


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ig 
\ 3 


C4] 





A Cast-Full of Stars... 
A Story-Full of Surprises... 
A Screen-Full of Howls! 


Mat 204—I11 inches x 2 columns (210 lines )—30c 


Those balmy “Brother 
Rats” hit Broadway... 


right on the funnybone! 


with the 
‘Brother Rat’ cast 


EDDIE ALBERT - ROSEMARY LANE 
WAYNE MORRIS - JANE WYMAN 


RONALD REAGAN - RUTH TERRY 


Directed by RAY ENRIGHT 
A WARNER BROS.-First National Picture 


Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser * Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 


Mat 210—2'% inches x 2 columns (62 lines )—30c 














— 
Look OUTS: 
FOLKS.. 





When that amazing, 
riot-raising ‘Brother Rat’ 
gang blows in... 
brother, all your 
blues blow out! 






with 


EDDIE ALBERT 


He answered the call 
of the wild...women! 


ROSEMARY LANE 


She sings, she dances, 
she acts...so she thinks! 





WAYNE MORRIS 


He collects autographs 
...especially on checks! 







JANE WYMAN 


As beautiful as a dia- 
mond...and just as hard! 


RONALD REAGAN 


He’s a genius...in a 
dopey sort of way! 





RUTH TERRY 


She’s been keeping com- 
pany for ten years... 
& with a guy in Alcatraz! 


Directed by RAY ENRIGHT 
A WARNER BROS..First National Picture 
Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser 
Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 





Mat 107 
9% inches (132 lines )—Il5c 


'/ Your Favorite Fun- 
sters... Still Leading 
Your Laugh Parade! 


Directed by RAY ENRIGHT 


A WARNER BROS..- First National Picture 
Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauset 
Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 


Mat 110 
3% inches (46 lines )—15c 





<= 















It’s your favorite riot- 

raisin’ funsters...leading 
the laugh parade up 

) Broadway! More mad 
fun than the Main 

Stem’s seen in years! 

Have yourself a howlin’, 

heavenly time with 













with the ‘Brother Rat’ Cast with the 


EDDIE ALBERT - ROSEMARY LANE oe Nien 
~» WAYNE MORRIS - JANE WYMAN ALBERT 
RONALD REAGAN - RUTH TERRY | a 


=f Directed by RAY ENRIGHT Ww 
)) 
( i ) A WARNER BROS.-First National Picture } {OR RIS 
PP Sceeen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser * Based on a Play by George S. aes IS 





JANE 


WYMAN 
Mat 205—5'2 inches x 2 columns (152 lines )—30c RONALD 


REAGAN 


RUTH 


TERRY 


Directed by 
RAY ENRIGHT 


A WARNER BROS. 
First National Picture 








TWO ADS 
ON ONE MAT 


EP 


Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser 
Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 





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7 inches (99 lines )—15e 







It’s that Funderful 
Cast of “Brother 


That ‘Brother 
Rat’ gang in 
their latest, 
looniest, laff- 















e es e e 
lest hith Official Billing 
WARNER BROS. 40% 
EDDIE ALBERT ROSEMARY LANE = WAYNE MORRIS Pictures, Inc. Presents 3% 
JANE WYMAN + RONALD REAGAN » RUTH TERRY “AN ANGEL FROM TEXAS” 
Directed by RAY ENRIGHT . 100 % 
s NER BROS. - First National Picture we 
creen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhau i 
Based on a Play by George S, Kaufman “ Eddie Albert bs Rosemary La ne °* Wayne Mo rris 
Oe: 40% 
Jane Wyman * Ronald Reagan + Ruth Terry 

It’s the ‘Brother 5 

Rats’...in 40 % 












‘Brother Rat’ cast 


EDDIE ALBERT 
ROSEMARY LANE 

WAYNE MORRIS - JANE 

WYMAN + RONALD 

REAGAN « RUTH TERRY eo 

DIRECTED BY RAY ENRIGHT Gy) gust 

A WARNER BROS..-First National Picture Eddie ALBERT» Rosemary LANE- Wayne MORRIS 


Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser Jane WYMAN x Ronald REAGAN x Ruth TERRY 
pt ons Tie Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser 
Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 


Directed by Ray Enright 25% 

* 
Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser 3% 
Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman 2% 

e 


their looniest, 
laffinest, latest! 


A Warner Bros.-First National Picture 5% 





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4% inches (60 lines )—15c Mat 109—15c 


Warner Bros. Shorts 


TECHNICOLOR PRODUCTIONS presents ‘Teddy The Rough 
Rider,’’ a worthy addition to the historical featurets. Sidney Black- 
mer is featured in this smash short dealing with the quick succes- 
sion of events in the life of the beloved Roosevelt 1. 5004— 
Technicolor Productions—2 reels—19 minutes. 






> 
> EDDIE ALBERT MERRIE MELODIES offers ‘Cross County Detours,” with laughs 
TH ROSEMARY LANE galore in another gag-studded satire on those travelogue shorts. 


WAYNE MORRIS « JANE 5314—Merrie Melodies—7 minutes. 


WYMAN - RONALD MELODY MASTERS gives us ‘’Carl Hoff And Orchestra.’’ The 
genial maestro of ‘’Hit Parade’’ fame gets in a ‘‘sending’’ groove, 
REAGAN - RUTH TERRY resulting in show-stopping music. 5507—-Melody Masters—10 


minutes. 
/Directed by RAY ENRIGHT - A WARNER BROS..-First National Pictute 


Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser * Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman VITAPHONE VARIETIES provides us with The Grouch Club in 
“No Parking,’’ offering further hilarious adventures in the life 
story of a grouch. A laugh-a-second side-splitter! 5704—Vita- 
phone Varieties—10 minutes. 


LOONEY TUNES stars Porky Pig as ‘Slap Happy Pappy.’’ Porky’s 
a farmer now with five little girl and boy chickens plus a laugh- 
provoking lampoon on some of our celebrities. 5611——Looney 
Tunes—7/ minutes. 





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[6] 





Idea is to select song title which best fits each photo shown 
on this page. Ten song titles are scattered among classified 
ads each day. Captions beneath scene stills give clues to cor- 


rect title. Order Mat 201B—30c—or Contest Stills—30c 


—from Warner Bros. Campaign Plan Editor. 


CONTEST FOR ADVANCE BREAKS 


CONTEST OPENS TODAY 





In this scene from “‘An Angel From Texas,” Jane Wyman is getting 
Eddie Albert dressed for his role in a Broadway play. What song 
title does this scene suggest? Turn to classified page for clues. 


(Correct answer. . 











Eddie Albert and Rosemary Lane are listening to their echoes re- 
sounding in the nearby hills. What song title does this scene still 


GUESS THE SONG TITLE 








- “Where Did You Get That Hat?’’) 


LAST DAY 


Spot These Titles 
On Classified Page 
‘“‘Where Did You Get That 


Hat?” “Gaucho Serenade,” 
“Little Sir Echo,” “In An 
Old Dutch Garden,” “No, 
No, A Thousand Times 
No,”’ ‘Indian Summer,” 
“T Got A Feelin’ I’m Fall- 


in’,”’ ““Memories,”’ “Angels 


““My Gal Sal.”’ 


from “An Angel From Texas” suggest? Consult Want Ad page for 


answer clues. (Correct answer... “Little Sir Echo.”’) 


With Dirty Faces,” and 








In this scene from “An Angel From 
Texas,” this is how Rosemary Lane 
and Eddie Albert look after acting 
in a Broadway show. What song 
title does this scene suggest? (An- 
swer: “Angels With Dirty Faces.”’) 





EXPLOITIPS FOR YOUR SHOWMANSHIP 


TAKE GALS’ PHOTOS 


In keeping with unknown girl getting 
Broadway break, get word around that 
local photographer will pass through 
town taking pictures of people alone or 
in groups. In the lobby post the pictures 
with certain people circled. Those so 
designated get passes to your show. 


ANGEL STREET BALLY 


Attractive gal dressed as Texas cowgirl 
covers important sections of town on 
horse-back distributing heralds to pass- 
ersby. She wears sign on back reading, 
“I’m one of the angels from Texas.” 


SWEEPSTAKES WINNER 


Cueing on Jane Wyman’s role of a sweep- 
stakes winner, contact feature writer to 
promote news story on sweeps winners 
in town telling how winnings affected 
their modes of living. 


Tested Stunts 


This hilarious comedy lends itself 
to every kind of gag stunt you can 
think of. Here are just a few of the 
comedy ideas you can put into 
work: 
Ambulance calling for sick man weak 
from laughing. 


Man parades street laughing continu- 
ously with sign on back reading, “I 
didn’t take laughing gas. | just saw 
‘An Angel From Texas’ at the 
Strand.” 


Man wearing sling for arm broken 
when he fell out of seat laughing. 


Play laugh record over P.A. system 
during picture’s run. 


Local restaurants distribute cards read- 
ing, “After a good meal there’s noth- 
ing like a good laugh. See ‘An Angel 
From Texas’ at the Strand Theatre.” 


“‘Headless’’ man in street carries copy, 
“| laughed my head off at ‘An Angel 
From Texas’ at the Strand.” 





[7] 


LOBBY GRAPH 


Play up the phenomenal rise of Eddie 
Albert by graph in lobby. Start at bot- 
tom with “Brother Rat”; continue up- 
ward with “On Your Toes,” “Four 
Wives,” and “Brother Rat and a Baby’ 
until it reaches the top with “An Angel 
From Texas.” Use flashing lights and | 
illustrate with stills from each picture. 


COMIC WORD CONTEST 


Promote newspaper contest wherein 
readers send in comic words of their own 
origin to describe picture such as “‘fun- 
derful”’ and “‘roarnado.”’ 


CINDERELLA STUNT 


In keeping with cinderella aspect of 
story, tie in with local shoe store to pro- 
vide pair of shoes for first woman who 
can wear them comfortably. Select very 
small size and hold tryouts in lobby. 








Mat 201—30c 


THAT'S EDDIE ALBERT WITH THE LONG HAIR in one of the funniest 
sequences in “An Angel From Texas'' coming to the Strand next Friday. 
Rosemary Lane is the girl “acting up" with Eddie. The get-up is part of the fun. 








‘“‘An Angel From Texas’”’ 
Stars ‘Bro. Rat’ Cast 


Romping through the gay 
Warner Bros. comedy, “An 
Angel From Texas,” which is 
coming to the Strand Theatre 
next Friday, is the gay trio ot 
“Brother Rats’’—Eddie Albert, 
Wayne Morris and Ronald Rea- 
gan—and their three comely girl 
friends—Rosemary Lane, Jane 
Wyman and Ruth Terry. 

The rollicking story of a 
couple of hicks from the Texas 
sticks is based on George S. 
Kaufman’s successful play “The 
Butter and Egg Man.” A novel 
screen adaptation was done by 
Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram 
Millhauser, with the capable 
young director Ray Enright 
handling the production. 

As Lydia Weston, the pride 
of Lone Star, Texas, Rosemary 
Lane plays the  stage-struck 
country girl. Eddie Albert is 
Peter, her boy friend, who is 
saving his money to buy a hotel 
some day. 

Lydia leaves for New York, 
where she covers casting offices 
to no avail and failing to get a 
stage job, becomes secretary to 


two shoe string producers, Mar- 
ty Allen and Mac McClure, play- 
ed by Ronald Reagan and Wayne 
Morris. 

When Peter comes to New 
York with $20,000, looking for 
a hotel before he asks Lydia to 
marry him, Marty and Mac go 
to work on him. They need a 
backer and decide that Peter is 
it. Complications set in when 
Lydia steps into the role Valerie 
Blayne, played by Ruth Terry, 
had been given. Valerie is a 
gangster’s sweetheart and threa- 
tens trouble when her boy friend 
gets out of the stir. 

Rehearsals indicate that the 
show will lay the biggest Broad- 
way egg of the season and 
Marty’s wife Marge, played by 
Jane Wyman, determines to 
teach her husband a lesson for 
exploiting the unfortunate yok- 
els. She helps Peter buy the 
show outright with her own 
money. When the _ intended 
drama is accepted as a hilarious 
farce, Peter and Lydia are ac- 
claimed the season’s comets over 
Broadway. 


CAST OF CHARACTERS 


Peter Colman 


oe se 


“Remember When’ 
Days Recalled On 
Set Of Strand Film 


The long unused Vitagraph 
lot of the Warner Bros. studios, 
with private roadways gutted by 
the rains, weeds crowding out 
the once carefully tended flower 
beds and buildings with cracked 
and peeling paint, came to life 
recently when Eddie Albert and 
Rosemary Lane headed a “loca- 
tion’ company there, shooting 
scenes for Warners’ “An Angel 
From Texas,” the film coming to 
the Strand Friday. 

Whenever a company from 
Warner Bros. goes on location 
on the old Vitagraph grounds 
inevitably the old-timers go into 
their “remember whens.” Not 
the youngsters in the cast of 
“An Angel From Texas”—Al- 
bert and Miss Lane, Wayne Mor- 
ris, Ronald Reagan and Jane 
Wyman were in rompers in those 
days. But the gaffers, and the 
juicers, and some of the extras 
who have been doing walk-ons 
in terms of decades. There is, 
for instance, Johnny Hyams, 
who started as a grip 35 years 
ago. 

He smiles and rolls off names 
and dates and early triumphs. 
Like Maurice Costello, the great 
matinee idol, and the latter’s 
daughter, Dolores, who came 
upon the same stage years later 
wearing the crown of stardom 
he’d let slip. Like Larry Semon, 
ace comedian of a gone genera- 


tion, whose two-reelers took two ° 


months to make—a full-length 
feature is made in that time 
today—and cost $100,000, but 


brought back $1,000,000 in 
profits. 

He remembers vividly John 
Barrymore starring in “Don 


Juan” 15 years ago. And he re- 
members when Tom Kennedy— 
Tom, who is back for a part in 
“An Angel From Texas,” smiles 
appreciatively as he tells it— 
signed for a fat part in “The 
Better ’Ole” with Sidney Chap- 
lin, only to do a burn on getting 
the script because he was to be 
a blacksmith who had to make 
love to a horse. 

He recalls later days. Days 
of Al Jolson and the talkie ava- 
lanche. Barrymore in “The Mad 
Genius” and “The Sea Beast.” 
William Dieterle, now the Acad- 
emy director of pictures like 
“Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet,’ 
then the star of the German 
version of “The Sea Beast.” 

What an album of memories. 
These and many, many more all 
enshrouded by a few old build- 
ings and grounds. In regal 
splendor, the famous of the 
screen once rode past these por- 
tals in long, sleek limousines. 
Now these rusty gates are locked 
and barred. Before them stands 
a sign: “For sale.” 


SYNOPSIS 
(Not For Publication) 
Lydia Weston (Rosemary Lane} 











(Opening Day) 


‘An Angel From Texas’’ 
Opens At Strand Today 


“An Angel From Texas,” the new film opening today at the 
Strand, serves to reunite one of the brightest groups of younger 
players in all of Hollywood. The film stars Eddie Albert, Rose- 
mary Lane, Wayne Morris, Jane Wyman, Ronald Reagan and 


Ruth Terry, who comprise prac- 
tically the same cast of funsters 
who first tickled your funny- 
bones in the memorable “Brother 
Rat” and “Brother Rat And A 
Baby.” 

This time they’re in a differ- 
ent setting, but the infectious 
air of gay hilarity still pervades. 
The film deals with two yokels 
from the Lone Star state who 
take Broadway and its sucker 
baiters by storm, and from all 
advance reports the new comedy 
will provide Strand audiences 
with one of the happiest ex- 
periences in a movie theatre. 

Charming Rosemary Lane is 
starred on her own merits, and 
we'll wager that this gifted mem- 
ber of the lovely Lane trio takes 
full advantage of her opportun- 
ity to play a sweet little country 
girl who wows hardened critics 
and jaded theatre-goers into 
coming back to see her show 
again and again. 

Eddie Albert portrays Miss 
Lane’s boy friend who is almost 
— but not quite — the victim 
of ruthless theatrical promoters. 
The promoters in this case are 
Wayne Morris and Ronald Rea- 
gan, a slippery pair who think 
nothing of duping innocent 
yokels out of their hard earned 
cash. 

Jane Wyman, Ronald Rea- 
gan’s recent bride, plays oppos- 
ite her husband as a clever wife 
with money of her own who sets 
out to teach hubby a lesson in 
honesty. After viewing many 
examples of the indomitable 
Wyman will, we are quite cer- 
tain that blonde Jane succeeds! 

“An Angel From Texas’ is 
adapted from George S. Kauf- 
man’s popular comedy, “The 
Butter And Egg Man,” which 
had a lengthy run on Broadway. 

In view of this, the Strand’s 
new arrival promises to be one 
of the brightest hits of the year. 

Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram 
Millhauser wrote the screen play, 
while Ray Enright directed. 








B’way Chorines In 
New Strand Comedy 


According to a poll among 24 
comely lasses supporting Eddie 
Albert and Rosemary Lane in 
Warner Bros.’ “An Angel From 
Texas,’ which opens at the 
Strand Friday, there are 118 
reasons—or some such round 
figure—why chorus girls should 
leave Broadway and head West. 

Former stage showgirl her- 
self, lovely Nancy Preston, 
spokesman for the group, with 
a tilt of her turned-up nose, a 
toss of her auburn tresses, and 
a twinkle in her blue-green eyes, 
explained: 

“It’s Leap Year, so consider 
matrimony first. In New York 
the only men you meet are the 
kid who jerks the sodas in the 
corner drugstore and _ the 
brokers with enlarged middles 
and bald heads who act like the 
Rover boys on the loose. 

“In Hollywood? Well, gosh, 
girls, just take your pick. 

“As for career, here you get 
a chance to do more than a few 
high-kicks, and you have to have 
more than a few curves in the 
right places. You’ve got to look 
all right for the cameras, and 
you have to show some acting 
ability. They aren’t always 
looking at your legs. The result 
is you’ve always got a chance 
for_a swell break. 

“On Broadway you can stay 
in the line until you’re a grand- 
mother, all the good it’ll do. 
That is, when you work—which 
usually averages about one 
week to every five between 
shows. 

“And the hours. Here you get 
that sunkissed complexion; there 
you tear your hair over a night- 
club pallor. 


Lydia Weston 
Mac McClure 
Marge Allen 

Marty Allen 

Valerie Blayne 
Quigley 

Mr. Robelink 
Addie Lou Coleman 


leaves boy friend Peter (Eddie Al- 
bert) and small town in Texas to head 
for New York and success on the 
stage. Failing to get employment, 
she obtains a job as secretary with 
two shoe string producers, Marty 
Allen (Ronald Reagan) and Mac 
McClure (Wayne Morris). The des- 
perate pair nabs Peter when he comes 
to New York with $20,000 to buy a 
hotel and marry Lydia. They finally 
sell him a piece of the show, firing 
Valerie Blayne (Ruth Terry), the 
gangster's sweetheart who is incensed 
when Lydia takes over her role. Marge 
Allen (Jane Wyman) is Marty's wife 
with money of her own. Seeing that 
the yokels are being exploited by her 
husband and his slick partner, she 
helps Peter buy out the show. The 
dramatic play is unintentionally 
played for comedy, and Peter and 
Lydia are comets over Broadway. 





PRODUCTION 


Directed by RAY ENRIGHT 


Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser; 

Based on a Play by George S. Kaufman; Associate Producer, 

Robert Fellows; Director of Photography, Arthur L. Todd, 

A.S.C.; Art Director, Esdras Hartley; Film Editor, Clarence 

Kolster; Dialogue Director, Hugh Cummings; Sound by 

Charles Lang; Makeup Artist, Perc Westmore; Gowns by 
Milo Anderson. 





Mat 202—30c 


SO THIS IS BROADWAY murmurs Eddie Albert while surrounded by an 
osculatory bevy of brunette beauty. That's what happens in "An Angel From 
Texas," the new comedy film coming to the Strand Theatre next Friday. 


Material on Page Ten 
[8] 





Additional Publicity 


TWO NATURALS FOR 
PROMOTION 


Here’s two oldies that should click for 
this show: “Talent Night’ and “Local 
Angel Contest.”” For the “Talent Night,” 
play it up big and tie in with the dramatic 
angle of the picture. The “Local Angel 
Contest” is a beauty contest run in co- 
operation with local newspaper. 
testants’ pics are judged by prominent 
localites and winner is presented to 


audience from your stage. 


TEST TOWN'S 
TEXAS I. Q. 


Quiz contest on Texas for 
inquiring reporter or his- 
tory and geography classes. 
First ten correct answers 
receive passes to see “An 
Angel From Texas.” 


1. Who cried, “‘Remember The 
Alamo?” (Texas soldiers when 
they defeated Santa Anna) 


2.How large is the State of 
Texas? (562,500 square miles) 


3. What is the next largest state 
in the Union? (California) 
4. Who was Santa Anna? (Mexi- 

can General in 1836) 


5. When was the Texas Centen- 
nial held? (1936) 


6. What bodies of water bound 
Texas on the South? (The 
Gulf of Mexico and Rio 
Grande) 


7. Why is Texas called ‘The Pan- 
handle State?” (Because it is 
shaped like a pan and handle) 


8. What is the capital of Texas? 
(Austin) 


9, What is a Texas Longhorn? 
(Breed of cow with very long 
horns) 


10. What are the leading indus- 
tries of Texas? (Oil, cotton, 
citrus fruits, lumber, leather 
and cattle) 


LOCAL DEALER 
TIE-UP STILLS 


Special stills, suitable for 
local dealer tie-ups are 
available on this produc- 
tion, featuring Rosemary 
Lane, Jane Wyman, Ronald 
Reagan and Wayne Morris. 
Get these into every shop 
in town. Order “Special 
Angel Tie-Up_ Stills’ — 
$1.00—from Warner 
Bros. Campaign Plan 
Editor, New York City. 


RUN A GALA 
“TEXAS NIGHT" 


Run a “Texas Night” in 
your theatre, inviting all 
former Texans and _ trav- 


elling men from the Lone Star State to attend your showing. 
Play it up big with gala parade and celebration on opening 
night. Be sure that the press is notified and have photogs on 
hand to snap pictures of all the prominent Texans there. 









Con- 





Freshy Playclothes promotion on this production in- 
cludes the following: advertisement in June issue of 
Photoplay Magazine featuring Rosemary Lane 
(above) ; window cards and counter displays for their 
1,000 dealers, illustrated with pictures of Jane Wyman 
and Rosemary Lane with prominent picture credits; 


and newspaper mats for local dealer ads. For further 
information and complete dealer list, contact: Mr. 
H. W. Goldman, The Goldman Company, 38-42 South 
Paca Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 





WARNER 
BROS. 
TRAILER 


[9] 


RADIO CONTEST FOR 
FAST TALKERS 


Contest was recently conducted over a 
national radio hookup to find fastest 
talking radio announcer. Contestants 
read from a prepared manuscript for a 
specified amount of time. Winners are 
judged by clarity, diction and rapidity. 
Announcer ties in your showing by men- 
tioning that Ronald Reagan and Wayne 
Morris give an amazing demonstration of 
fast-talking in “‘An Angel From Texas.” 


SELL THE WORD 
“ANGEL” 


Questions are good for lob- 
by, radio or inquiring re- 
porter. 

1. How many songs can you name 
that have the word “Angel” in 
the title? (“Angel In Dis- 
guise,”’ ““I Married An Angel,” 
“Goodnight Angel,” ‘Angels 
With Dirty Faces,” “Got A 


Date With An Angel,”’ 
“Angel’’) 


2. How many moving pictures can 
you list that have the word 
“Angel” in their title? (“An 
Angel From Texas,” “Angels 
With Dirty’ Faces,” “The 
Angels Wash Their Faces,” 
** White Angel,” ** Hell’s 
Angels’’) 


CONTEST FOR 
NOVEL TOASTS 


Promote a contest among 
men’s clubs and fraternal 
societies for original drink- 
ing toasts. Illustrate this 
with Still No. AT 29, show- 
ing Ronald Reagan, Eddie 
Albert and Wayne Morris 
toasting one another. Order 
—I15ce—from Warner 
Bros. Campaign Plan 
Editer, New York City. 


“HALO HAT" 
PIX DISPLAY 


According to Orry Kelly, of 
Hollywood, the halo hat is 
a prominent fashion-first. 
This can’t miss for window 
displays, so tie in copy 
reading: ‘Angel Halo 
styled from the motion pic- 
ture, ‘An Angel From Tex- 
as’.”’ Order ‘Halo Hat 
Stills” —25c—from War- 
ner Bros. Campaign Plan 
Editor, New York City. 


USE PREMIUM 
SPACE ADS 


Promote front page un- 
derliners in cooperation 
with local retailers. Copy 
reads: *‘An Angel From Texas’ has nothing on the angels 
from Blanktown after they buy new hats at the Hub Millinery 
Shop,” or “An Angel From Texas” won’t be as well dressed as 
the angels from Blanktown for Ash’s Baby Store is unexcelled.” 





ee 


‘An Angel From Texas”’ 
Scores Hit At Strand 


“An Angel From Texas,” with 
Eddie Albert, Rosemary Lane, 
Wayne Morris, Jane Wyman, 
Ronald Reagan, and Ruth Terry 
in the leading roles, is Warner 
Bros.’ latest comedy hit coming 
to the Strand Theatre next Fri- 
day. 

It’s the hilarious story of ad- 
ventures—and misadventures— 
of Lydia Weston, a _ corn-fed 
cutie from Lone Star, Texas. 
Lydia, fresh from the triumphs 
in the Elks Auditorium is bent 
on a great dramatic career in 
New York. Rosemary Lane plays 
this role, and opposite her is 
Eddie Albert and the rest of 
those “Brother Rats.” 

Broadway managers are sin- 
gularly unimpressed by Lydia’s 
high school histrionics, and she 
is forced to accept a secretarial 
job to Morris and Reagan, two 
shoe-string producers. When 
country boy Eddie Albert comes 
to the big city with $20,000 bulg- 
ing in his jeans and fostering 
the fond hope that he will buy 
a hotel and settle down with 
Lydia, the producers pounce on 
him and sell him an interest in 
a play fairly reeking of moth 
balls. Eddie willingly signs the 
check since the agreement stipu- 
lates that the starry-eyed Lydia 
will be leading lady. Unfortun- 


Eddie Albert, New 
Star,ExploresMexico 


Eddie Albert, Hollywood’s 
newest star, soon to be seen in 
“An Angel From Texas” at the 
Strand Theatre, is one of the 
film colony’s harder-to-find 
stars. Just a few weeks ago, he 
caused his studio and friends a 
great deal of worry while ex- 
ploring the Mexican jungles. 
When the studio call sheet says 
he’ll be on Stage 12, Eddie can 
usually be found elsewhere. 

Albert, a 
one-time 
M i nneapolis 
usher, also 
added to the 
aggregate 
weight of the 
M inn esota 
public by in- 
venting rich- 
er, thicker, 
and _ stickier 
“home - style 





Mat 102—15c malted 
milks” behind a_ soda _ foun- 
tain. That didn’t last long, 


however, and a quick succession 
of jobs followed including thea- 
tre management, furniture sell- 
ing, bonds and insurance. He 
has also been a radio actor, and 
credits George Abbott and the 
plays “Brother Rat” and “Room 
Service” for his start in the 
movies. 

Albert’s profile would never 
do for a collar ad, his hair is un- 
ruly and stands straight, he is 
a vegetarian at heart, reads 
poetry, and lacks just half an 
inch of being six feet tall. 

Deliberate of manner, but 
forceful in his opinions, Albert 
is a serious-minded young man, 
as yet unmarried, and ambitious 
to be a writer as well as an 
actor. He saves some of his 
money and invests it in etchings 
and first editions. He plays the 
violin, piano and guitar. He 
saves old love letters too, and 
will walk a mile to see a parade 
—any parade. 

The rising star is more care- 
ful with his money than most 
actors, but admits he squanders 
a lot of it on books. He plays 
one game of golf a year. 





ately the plan hits a snag when 
the volatile leading lady, played 
by Ruth Terry, threatens to 
summon her boy friend ‘who 
gets outa Alcatraz in three 


weeks”? and have him plant a 


bomb under the stage. 

Luckily for the bumpkins, 
Reagan’s wife, played by lovely 
Jane Wyman, is a sweepstakes 
winner with a conscience. Cer- 
tain of the fact that she will 
cure her husband of his erring 
ways, she aids Eddie in buying 
the show outright. 

Built strictly for laughs, “An 
Angel From Texas,” with its 
cast of popular funsters, is bas- 
ed on George S. Kaufman’s high- 
ly successful ‘‘The Butter and 
Egg Man.” 

Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram 
Millhauser wrote the screen 
play, directed by Ray Enright. 


Eddie Albert Off Again 


Eddie Albert is having his 
yawl, the Moilie, completely 
overhauled, and will be off to 
Mexican waters again as soon as 
the boat is declared seaworthy. 
The star is currently appearing 
in “Angel From Texas” at the 
Strand Theatre this week. 


Rosemary Lane 


Once Radio Star 


Rosemary Lane, star of “An 
Angel From Texas,’ which 
opens at the Strand Theatre on 
Friday, found that radio was 
her springboard to the movies. 

Several years ago when the 
Ford or Old Gold hours brought 
the dulcet strains of Fred War- 
ing and his Pennsylvanians to 
the air, Rosemary’s singing 
made her’s a name to conjure 
with. To millions of young 
hearts every- 
where she 
typified the 
American 
college girl. 
7. Xan a 0 a 8) 
school and at 
Simpson. Col- 
lege, Rose- 
marywas 
just that. 
She went in 
for track, 

Mat 101—15<« tennis, hoc- 
and soccer. No campus 


key, 
grind, she has’ always had a 
grand sense of humor and is a 
great fun-lover. 

When Waring and orchestra 
trekked to California in 1937 to 
co-star with Dick Powell in the 


collegiate musical, “Varsity 
Show,’” Warner’s looked Rose- 
mary over, liked what they saw, 
screen-tested her, found that she 
could act just as charmingly 
as she could sing, and cast her 
in the leading feminine role. 
That picture and Rosemary were 
smash hits, and her next assign- 
ment was in “Hollywood Hotel,” 
also opposite Powell. 

In the meantime, sister Pris- 
cilla was making quite a name 
for herself, and the two girls 
with sister Lola, scored triumph- 
antly in such hits as “Four 
Daughters,” “Daughters Cour- 
ageous” and “Four Wives.” Re- 
cently the studio decided that 
the girls have separate, vivid 
personalities and will be starred 
on their own merits. 

Rosemary’s favorite actresses 
are Priscilla and Lola. Her pet 
extravagance is shoes, she does- 
n’t like cigar smoke, hates show- 
offs, and bleached blondes, 








Mat 203—30c 


“| GET THAT LEAD OR ELSE!''—gangster's moll, Ruth Terry tells shoe-string 
producers Wayne Morris and Ronald Reagan, while pert Jane Wyman seems 
to have ideas of her own in "An Angel From Texas," at the Strand Friday. 








There’s Gold in Platinum 


Rosemary Lane, currently 
starred in Warner Bros.’ “An 
Angel From Texas,” recently 
turned down a large cash offer 
from the representative of a 
national association of beauty 
shops to become a_ platinum 
blonde. He said the platinum 
blonde craze started by the late 
Jean Harlow had proven one of 
the greatest stimuli the business 
had ever experienced. 


Wayne Morris Grin 
Gave Him Film Start 


Even a beard could not hide 
the engaging grin that gave 
Wayne Morris his big break in 
films. 

Wayne was schooling himself 
for an actor’s career at the Pas- 
adena Playhouse when Irving 
Kumin, a Warner Bros.’ talent 
scout, discovered the grin be- 
hind the whiskers which were 
part of Wayne’s make-up. He 
was given a Warner Bros.’ con- 
tract the 
week before 
he _— received 
his diploma 
fromthe 
Pasadena 
Play house 
School. 

Wayne was 
t born in Los 
Angeles, at- 
tended Los 

: Angeles High 
Mat 105—15¢ School, Los 
Angeles Junior College and the 
Community Playhouse School of 
the Theatre. He was Bert De 
Wayne Morris, Jr. before the 
Playhouse suggested shortening 
his name for professional pur- 
poses. 

Gilmor Brown and Thomas 
Browne Henry, the school’s two 
famous directors, recognized his 
talent when he worked under 
them at Pasadena. They gave 
him good parts: the title role 
in “Mr. Pickwick,” Captain La 
Hire in “St. Joan,” Pistol in 
“Henry V,” Ajax in “Troilus 
and Cressida,” and Dean in 
“Yellowjack.”’ 

At the school Wayne studied 
all phases of theatrical art, play 
composition, set designing, light- 
ing. He has thought of directing. 

On the Pasadena stage he re- 
members most vividly working 
with William Farnum, Irving 
Pichel and Gilmor Brown. On 
the screen he has played in “Kid 
Galahad,” “Love, Honor and 
Behave,” “Submarine  D-1,” 
“Men Are Such Fools,” “Valley 
of the Giants,” “Brother Rat,” 
“The-Kid from Kokomo,” “Bro- 
ther Rat and a Baby” and “An 
Angel From Texas.” 





[10] 


Curtains For Sister Act 


The Lanes as a sister act are 
through. From now on, Warner 
Bros., which has both Rosemary 
and Priscilla under long term 
contract, will disassociate them, 
giving each an individual build- 
up to top stardom. The studio 
is casting about for story ma- 
terial for the girls individually. 
Rosemary’s latest is “An Angel 
From Texas” opposite Eddie 
Albert, coming to the Strand. 


Jane Wyman's 
Hair Brings Luck 


Pert is a good word to use in 
describing St. Joseph, Missouri’s 
principal contribution to the mo- 
tion picture sereen. A racing 
man would probably pronounce 
her “A trim filly if ever there 
was one.” Last year’s college 
boy would call her “smooth.” 
This year’s sophomore will have 
a new superlative. 


She’s Sarah Jane Wyman, 
known as Jane Wyman on the 
; screen and 
to her ever 
inc reasing 
hordeof 
fans. 

Pert, trim 
and efferves- 
centasa 
seidletz pow- 
der in a gob- 
let of cham- 
pagne. And 
as sparkling. 

Mat 104A—15e Those big 
brown eyes get you first. Wide 
apart, friendly and alive. Then 
the saucy up-tilt of her nose. 
Then even white teeth framed 
in one of Hollywood’s most gen- 
uine smiles. Then about 100 
pounds of perfect figure. 


The boys in St. Joe never 
should have let her get away. 
But Jane Wyman landed in 
Hollywood just as surely as a 
river finds its way to the sea. 
And, as a matter of fact, after 
just about as much wandering. 
It was after singing over the 
radio that she was given her 
first job in pictures, a small part 
as the hat check girl in “Smart 
Blonde.” She got a hunch from 
that first part, dyed her hair 
from brown to platinum. 


“When I changed my hair I 
actually changed my whole per- 
sonality,” Jane confided, as she 
prepared to step into a scene 
with her on the screen and off 
husband, Ronald Reagan, in 
Warners’ “An Angel From 
Texas.” 

“Before I became a blonde I 
had tried everything to get a 
start as an actress but no one in 
Hollywood gave me a tumble. 





ee en ee ee ee So ee SE SES ES SE en 


Two Who Made Good 


In 1919 a standing gag be- 
tween Hobart Cavanaugh and 
another chorus boy in “Irene” 
was that when they made their 
“first million’ they’d forsake 
New York and retire on a citrus 
ranch in California. So the other 
day Cavanaugh, currently in 
Warner Bros.’ “An Angel From 
Texas,”’ moved into his new place 
at Encino and went over to in- 
troduce himself to his next-door 
neighbor. The latter is John 
Litel, his old Broadway pal. 


Pent Up in Penthouse 


There are supposed to be only 
two other people in town who 
know the address of the honey- 
moon penthouse taken by Jane 
Wyman and Ronald Reagan. 
But the newlyweds had to give 
up their privacy to appear in 
Warner Bros.’ “An Angel From 
Texas,” and film coming to the 
Strand on Friday. 


Reward Offered! 


Wayne Morris, now appearing 
in Warner Bros.’ “An Angel 
From Texas,” offered one-hun- 
dred dollars for the return of 
his beard with no question ask- 
ed. The beard which was either 
lost or stolen is one of his most 
prized possessions. The night he 
was discovered by a Warner tal- 
ent scout at the Pasadena Play- 
house, Morris was playing a 
character role and the beard was 
used as part of his make-up. 


Ronald Reagan Is 
Easy To Please 


Ronald Reagan and Jane Wy- 
man are on their way to an 
unique distinction in Hollywood 
as being one married couple in 
the film colony that has not 
authored its own “Rules. for 
Successful Matrimony.” 


Not that the Reagans are not 
happily mated. They are ready 
to rave about each other at the 
drop of the hat. And they have 
every intention of keeping on 
joPsst.t hea + 
way. 

Buuete © t 
would take 
more than 
the combined 
forces of J. 
Edgar Hoov- 
er’s G-men 
to find out 
justhow 
these newly- 
weds, now 

Mat 103—15¢ appearing in 
Warner Bros.’ “An Angel From 
Texas,” which opens at the 
Strand Friday, are going to 
make their marriage stick. 


They take the stand—novel 
indeed for Hollywood—that (1) 
their married life is their pri- 
vate concern, and (2) the proper 
time and place for a couple to 
reveal its rules for ideal domes- 
tic bliss is in a fireside chat at 
their Golden Wedding feast. 


Besides, they say, they don’t 
believe in rules. “As far as 
we’re concerned the public are 
a lot of in-laws. We want very 
much to have them like us, and 
we want to go on liking them. 
But in-laws can start an awful 
lot of trouble, given half the 
chance, so we’re on guard. 

“We're just going to mind our 
little garden patch in our own 
little way. And that doesn’t 
mean,” he went on with just the 
merest hint of a steel glint in 
his eye, “that we are going to 
raise a lot of little sprouts.” 

“Does it mean you are not 
going to raise a lot of sprouts?” 
he was asked. 

“We haven’t made up a rule 
on that yet,” he explained. 








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snk uasemany Warm sat 

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RONALD RUTH 


REAGAN-TERRY gat 


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FS. KAUPMAN 





wean €a BROS IAST NATIONAL PICTURE 








Mat 201—3% 


THAT'S EDDIE ALBERT WITH THE LONG HAIR in one of the funniest 
sequences in “An Angel From Texas” coming to the Strand next Friday. 
Rosemary Lane is the girl “acting up” w:th Eddie. The get-up is part of the fun. 


‘‘An Angel From Texas”’ 
Stars ‘Bro. Rat’ Cast 


Romping through the gay 
Warner Bros. comedy, “An 
Angel From Texas,” which is 
coming to the Strand Theatre 
next Friday, is the gay trio of 
“Brother Rats’’—Eddie Albert, 
Wayne Morris and Ronald Rea- 
yan and their three comely girl 
friends—Rosemary Lane, Jane 
Wyman and Ruth Terry. 

The rollicking story of a 
couple of hicks from the Texas 
sticks is based on George 3. 
Kaufman's successful play “The 
Butter and Egg Man.” A novel 
sereen adaptation was done by 


Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram 
Millhauser, with the capable 
young director Ray Enright 


handling the production. 

As Lydia Weston, the pride 
of Lone Star, Texas, Rosemary 
Lane plays the  stage-struck 
country girl. Eddie Albert is 
Peter, her boy friend, who is 
saving hix money to buy a hotel 
some day. 

Lydia leaves for New York, 
where she covers casting offices 
to no avail and failing to get a 
stage job, becomes secretary to 


two shoe string producers, Mar- 
ty Allen and Mae McClure, play- 
ed by Ronald Reagan and Wayne 
Morris. 

When Peter comes to New 
York with $20,000, looking for 
a hotel before he asks Lydia to 
marry him, Marty and Mae go 
to work on him. They need a 
backer and decide that Peter ix 
it. Complications set in when 
Lydia steps into the role Valerie 
Blayne, played by Ruth Terry, 
had been given. Valerie is a 
yvangster’s sweetheart and threa- 
tens trouble when her boy friend 
vets out of the stir. 

Rehearsals indicate that the 
show will lay the biggest Broad- 
way egg of the season and 
Marty's wife Marge, played by 
Jane Wyman, determines to 
teach her husband a lesson for 
exploiting the unfortunate yok- 
els. She helps Peter buy the 
show outright with her own 
money. When the — intended 
drama is accepted as a hilarious 
farce, Peter and Lydia are ac- 
claimed the season's comets over 
Broadway. 


CAST OF CHARACTERS 


Peter Colman 
Lydia Weston 


EDDIE ALBERT 
ROSEMARY LANE 


Lydia 





“Remember When” 
Days Recalled On 
Set Of Strand Film 


The long unused Vitagraph 
lot of the Warner Bros. studios, 
with private roadways gutted by 
the rains, weeds crowding out 
the once carefully tended flower 
beds and buildings with cracked 
and peeling paint, came to life 
recently when Eddie Albert and 
Rosemary Lane headed a “loca- 
tion” company there, shooting 
scenes for Warners’ “An Angel 
From Texas,” the film coming to 
the Strand Friday. 

Whenever a company from 
Warner Bros. goes on location 
on the old Vitagraph grounds 
inevitably the old-timers go into 
their “remember whens.” Not 
the youngsters in the cast of 
“An Angel From Texas"—Al- 
bert and Miss Lane, Wayne Mor- 
ris, Ronald Reagan and Jane 
Wyman were in rompers in those 
days. But the gaffers, and the 
juicers, and some of the extras 
who have been doing walk-ons 
in terms of decades. There is, 
for instance, Johnny Hyams, 
who started as a grip 35 years 
ago. 

He smiles and rolls off names 
and dates and early triumphs.- 
Like Maurice Costello, the great 
matinee idol, and the latter’s 
daughter, Dolores, who came 
upon the same stage years later 
wearing the crown of stardom 
he'd let slip. Like Larry Semon, 
ace comedian of a gone genera- 
tion, whose two-reelers took two 
months to make—a full-length 
feature is made in that time 
today—and cost $100,000, but 
brought back $1,000,000 in 
profits. 

He remembers vividly John 
Barrymore starring in “Don 
Juan” 15 years ago. And he re- 
members when Tom Kennedy 
Tom, who is back for a part in 
“An Angel From Texas,” smiles 
appreciatively as he tells it— 
signed for a fat part in “The 
Better 'Ole” with Sidney Chap- 
lin, only to do a burn on getting 
the script because he was to be 
a blacksmith who had to make 
love to a horse. 

He recalls later days. Days 
of Al Jolson and the talkie ava- 
lanche. Barrymore in “The Mad 
Genius” and “The Sea Beast.” 
William Dieterle, now the Acad- 
emy director of pictures like 
“Dr. Ehrlich’s Magie Bullet,” 
then the star of the German 
version of “The Sea Beast.” 

What an album of memories. 
These and many, many more all 
enshrouded by a few old build- 
ings and grounds. In regal 
splendor, the famous of the 
screen once rode past these por- 
tals in long, sleek limousines. 
Now these rusty gates are locked 
and barred. Before them stands 
a sign: “For sale.” 


SYNOPSIS 
(Not For Publication) 
Weston (Rosemary Lane!) 


(Opening Day) 


‘‘An Angel From Texas”’ 
Opens At Strand Today 


“An Angel From Texas,’ 


the new film opening today at the 


Strand, serves to reunite one of the brightest groups of younger 
players in all of Hollywood. The film stars Eddie Albert, Rose- 
mary Lane, Wayne Morris, Jane Wyman, Ronald Reagan and 


Ruth Terry, who comprise prac- 
tically the same cast of funsters 
who first tickled your funny- 
bones in thé memorable “Brother 
Rat” and “Brother Rat And A 
Baby.” 

This time they’re in a differ- 
ent setting, but the infectious 
air of gay hilarity still pervades. 
The film deals with two yokels 
from the Lone Star state who 
take Broadway and its sucker 
baiters by storm, and from all 
advance reports the new comedy 
will provide Strand audiences 
with one of the happiest ex- 
periences in a movie theatre. 

Charming Rosemary Lane is 
starred on her own merits, and 
we'll wager that this gifted mem- 
ber of the lovely Lane trio takes 
full advantage of her opportun- 
ity to play a sweet little country 
girl who wows hardened critics 
and jaded theatre-goers into 
coming back to see her show 
again and again. 

Eddie Albert portrays Miss 
Lane’s boy friend who is almost 

- but not quite — the victim 
of ruthless theatrical promoters. 
The promoters in this case are 
Wayne Morris and Ronald Rea- 
gan, a slippery pair who think 
nothing of duping innocent 
yokels out of their hard earned 
cash, 

Jane Wyman, Ronald Rea- 
gan’s recent bride, plays oppos- 
ite her husband as a clever wife 
with money of her own who sets 
out to teach hubby a lesson in 
honesty. After viewing many 
examples of the indomitable 
Wyman will, we are quite cer- 
tain that blonde Jane succeeds! 

“An Angel From Texas” is 
adapted from George S. Kauf- 
man’s popular comedy, “The 
Butter And Egg Man,” which 
had a lengthy run on Broadway. 

In view of this, the Strand’s 
new arrival promises to be one 
of the brightest hits of the year. 

Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram 
Millhauser wrote the screen play, 
while Ray Enright directed. 





B'way Chorines In 
New Strand Comedy 


According to a poll among 24 
comely lasses supporting Eddie 
Albert and Rosemary Lane in 
Warner Bros.’ “An Angel From 
Texas,” which opens at the 
Strand Friday, there are 118 
reasons—or some such round 
figure—why chorus girls should 
leave Broadway and head West. 

Former stage showgirl her- 
self, lovely Nancy Preston, 
spokesman for the group, with 
a tilt of her turned-up nose, a 
toss of her auburn tresses, and 
a twinkle in her blue-green eyes, 
explained: 

“It’s Leap Year, so consider 
matrimony first. In New York 
the only men you meet are the 
kid who jerks the sodas in the 
corner drugstore and _ the 
brokers with enlarged middles 
and bald heads who act like the 
Rover. boys on the loose. 

“In Hollywood? Well, gosh, 
girls, just take your pick. 

“As for career, here you get 
a chance to do more than a few 
high-kicks, and you have to have 
more than a few curves in the 
right places. You’ve got to look 
all right for the cameras, and 
you have to show some acting 
ability. They aren't always 
looking at your legs. The result 
is you've always got a chance 
for a swell break. 

“On Broadway you can stay 
in the line until you’re a grand- 
mother, all the good it'll do. 
That is, when you work—which 
usually averages about one 
week to every five between 
shows. 

“And the hours. Here you get 
that sunkissed complexion; there 
you tear your hair over a night- 
club pallor. 


leaves boy friend Peter (Eddie Al- 

WAYNE MORRIS bert) and small town in Texas to head 

JANE WYMAN for New York and success on the 

RONALD REAGAN stage. Failing to get employment, 

she obtains a job as secretary with 

RUTH TERRY two shoe string producers, Marty 

JOHN LITEL Allen (Ronald Reagan) and Mac 

HOBART CAVENAUGH McClure (Wayne Morris). The des- 

ANN SHOEMAKER perate pair nabs Peter when he comes 
TOM KENNEDY 


Mac McClure 
Marge Allen 
Marty Allen 
Valerie Blayne 
Quigley 

Mr. Robelink 

Addie Lou Coleman 
Chopper 


to New York with $20,000 to buy a 
hotel and marry Lydia. They finally 
sell him a piece of the show, firing 
Valerie Blayne (Ruth Terry), the 
gangsters sweetheart who is incensed 
when Lydia takes over her role. Marge 
Allen (Jane Wyman) is Marty's wife 
with money of her own. Seeing that 
the yokels are being exploited by her 
husband and his slick partner, she 
helps Peter buy out the show. The 
dramatic play is unintentionally 
played for comedy, and Peter and 
Lydia are comets over Broadway 


PRODUCTION 


Directed by RAY ENRIGHT 


Screen Play by Fred Niblo, Jr. and Bertram Millhauser 

Based on a Play by George §. Kaufman: Associate Producer 

Robert Fellows: Director of Photography, Arthur L. Todd 

AS.C.; Art Director, Esdras Hartley; Film Ed tor Clarence 

Kolster; Dialogue Director, Hugh Cummings, Sound by 

Charles Lang; Makeup Artist, Perc Westmore: Gowns by 
Milo Anderson 





Mut 102—40 


SO THIS 1S BROADWAY murmurs Eddie Albert while surrounded by an 
osculatory bevy of brunette beauty. That's what happens in An Angel From 
Texas, the new comedy film coming to the Strand Theatre next Friday. 





Material on Page Ten 


[Ss] 


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Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research, 
with support from Richard Koszarski. 





WISCONSIN CENTER 


FOR FILM & THEATER RESEARCH 


http://wcftr.commarts.wisc.edu 


MEDIA 
HISTORY 


DIGITAL LIBRARY 





www.mediahistoryproject.org